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24 Fun Indoor Activities for a Great Family Time this Covid-19 Season

24 Fun Indoor Activities for a Great Family Time this Covid-19 Season

Did you know that the American Heart Association recommends children ages 6 to 17 get at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day? Toddlers and preschoolers need even more. Here are ideas for days when we’re safer to stay home due to Covid-19 or when the weather doesn’t cooperate.

23 Fun Indoor Activities for a Great Family Time this Covid-19 Season

Check out these fun activities to keep the youngsters heart- healthy, imaginative, excited and productive at home.
1. Have a cookie-decorating session with your children and other family members. It’s a great bonding time with them and the best part is you’ll get to eat those cookies when you’re done.
2. Bake homemade treats. Plan a virtual cookie decorating party with your child’s grandparents or other loved ones, then you may put them in a box to give away as Christmas treat to the less fortunate people.

3. Teach the young ones the art of yoga. Yoga is one good way for children and adults of all ages to get exercise, practice mindfulness and cope with stress. During challenging times like the coronavirus pandemic, it’s a great habit to start – or continue.
4. Follow a fitness video, app or video game. Invite the family to do an exercise time before breakfast and follow along a video tutorial.


5. Have a dance party during the kids’ active hours. Play a dance music with a tutorial on Youtube, follow along, learn a new dance move and enjoy together.

6. Make a hand-drawn Christmas card. Bust out the crayons, markers, construction paper and glitter, and have your child spend an evening cranking out holiday masterpieces.
7. Make a thank-you note or drawing, for the teacher, their grandparents, doctors and nurses, deliveryman, etc. No matter who the recipient is, there is probably no nicer gift than a thoughtful thank-you. (Plus, gratitude is a powerful way to teach kids “positive reframing,” a practice that can help during challenging times.) To make the note feel more personal, encourage your child to include a specific reason they’re thankful for the person – for example, “Thanks for waving hello every day when you drop off our mail! It always makes me smile.”
8. Design a holiday craft. Search online for an age-appropriate DIY craft that your child can make, whether it’s a popsicle stick ornament or a paper plate Christmas tree. They can give it away as a Thank You token or add to the Christmas tree ornaments.
9. Designer for a day. This is the perfect time to clean up or redecorate the kids’ bedrooms. Let them get excited over it by involving them in their choice of design by thinking of a theme based on their favorite color, cartoon character or movie.

10. Set up a furniture obstacle course through the house. Use light and easy to pack away objects like tape measure, towels, etc so no one gets hurt (just in case..) and it would be easy to clean up after the game too.
11. Create a timed indoor scavenger hunt. Take turns in hiding an object that the rest of the family members would look for each time and put a timer on to increase the level of excitement as well.
12. Clear some space for hula-hooping and jumping rope. A good and fun exercise to learn.

3. Teach the young ones the art of yoga. Yoga is one good way for children and adults of all ages to get exercise, practice mindfulness and cope with stress. During challenging times like the coronavirus pandemic, it’s a great habit to start – or continue.
4. Follow a fitness video, app or video game. Invite the family to do an exercise time before breakfast and follow along a video tutorial.


5. Have a dance party during the kids’ active hours. Play a dance music with a tutorial on Youtube, follow along, learn a new dance move and enjoy together.

6. Make a hand-drawn Christmas card. Bust out the crayons, markers, construction paper and glitter, and have your child spend an evening cranking out holiday masterpieces.
7. Make a thank-you note or drawing, for the teacher, their grandparents, doctors and nurses, deliveryman, etc. No matter who the recipient is, there is probably no nicer gift than a thoughtful thank-you. (Plus, gratitude is a powerful way to teach kids “positive reframing,” a practice that can help during challenging times.) To make the note feel more personal, encourage your child to include a specific reason they’re thankful for the person – for example, “Thanks for waving hello every day when you drop off our mail! It always makes me smile.”
8. Design a holiday craft. Search online for an age-appropriate DIY craft that your child can make, whether it’s a popsicle stick ornament or a paper plate Christmas tree. They can give it away as a Thank You token or add to the Christmas tree ornaments.
9. Designer for a day. This is the perfect time to clean up or redecorate the kids’ bedrooms. Let them get excited over it by involving them in their choice of design by thinking of a theme based on their favorite color, cartoon character or movie.

10. Set up a furniture obstacle course through the house. Use light and easy to pack away objects like tape measure, towels, etc so no one gets hurt (just in case..) and it would be easy to clean up after the game too.
11. Create a timed indoor scavenger hunt. Take turns in hiding an object that the rest of the family members would look for each time and put a timer on to increase the level of excitement as well.
12. Clear some space for hula-hooping and jumping rope. A good and fun exercise to learn.


13. Mark a hopscotch course on the carpet or floor using masking tape. A fun activity to keep those bodies moving.
14. Hold indoor animal races. Hop like a frog; squat and waddle like a duck; scurry like a crab. Make a list of the animals and ask each member of the family to pick one and act the part in a race.
15. Bounce a balloon back and forth, keeping it aloft as long as possible. (Note: Balloons are a choking hazard for children under age 8.)  Set up a bedroom or a den for this game. Remove all breakables and push all furnitures away for safety. Play a dance music in the background and let the games begin.

16. Play indoor “hockey” with a pool noodle or child’s hockey stick, a balloon and a laundry basket or box on its side to serve as a net. Clear the play area or room to use of sharp object and breakables for safety.
17. Set up space for other sports indoors, like a soccer ball or indoor basketball hoop. There are miniature billiards table or basketball hoops that you can hang on a cabinet or door for a one on one game with your dad or brother.
18. Bring back classic games like tag, Duck Duck Goose, and Simon Says. This will be fun to share to the young ones, show them how we enjoy with friends before the xbox and playstation were discovered.
19. Play Follow the Leader, using energetic movements like jumping jacks and running in place. An activity that is both fun and promotes exercise as well.

20. Movie Time. Choose a theme for a day. List down the themes and take turns in picking the movie theme for the day, then choose a movie on Netflix or Amazon to play and watch. Make some popcorn and get your drinks for more enjoyment.
21. Karaoke Time. Invite the whole family to practice singing and plan on a performance day to share with other relatives the next time you connect through zoom or messenger. Download a free karaoke-style apps like Smule which offers everything from a piano track to accompanying vocals for a professional- like performance.
22. Virtual Caroling. Practice a happy Christmas song or medley of songs to cheer up the grandparents and relatives living abroad. Spread warmth and cheer to your loved ones these challenging times.

23. Documenting Covid-19 experience. This has been a very challenging time for all of us. There were so many changes and restrictions in the way we do things. We are living a history in the making as we speak.. one that will be talked about, learned from and studied about at schools. This is a perfect time to learn and start on making journals, photography or diary as to what we have experienced this whole Covid-19 time. As you make your journal, include unique things that you’ve learned and discovered that you’d be happy to share with your kids in the future.

24. Start a new hobby. Reading at home boosts school performance later on. It also increases vocabulary, raises self-esteem, builds good communication skills, and strengthens the prediction engine that is the human brain. Reading with your children builds warm and happy associations with books, increasing the likelihood that kids will find reading enjoyable in the future.

Have fun this holiday season with the whole family! Enjoy the great indoors! HAPPY HOLIDAYS everyone.
Check out our charming weekend drive to Kelowna or our family get-away to Agassiz if you’re looking for a quick drive this holiday season! Take care!

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